China—A Critical Partner for Trade

Count me among those business leaders who thought the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) was on the right track last year and would have brought significant benefits to all nations, including the United States.

Before President Trump withdrew the United States from the TPP trade negotiations, I had argued it would have unified the world’s most dynamic economic region—bringing together developed and developing countries that collectively represent 825 million consumers and 40% of the world’s economic output.

TPP would have eased crossborder trade and simplified international supply chains by eliminating tariffs, increasing transparency, and instituting stronger protections for intellectual property, labor, and the environment.

Another practical outcome would have been pressure on China—the world’s second largest economy—to eventually join. So sweeping was the TPP in its scope, with member nations including Japan, Singapore, Vietnam, Australia, as well as the United States, Mexico, and Canada—that China would have had little choice but to at least harmonize its trading practices with TPP countries, if not eventually join as a full-fledged member.

Fast-forward to today. With President Trump having kept his campaign promise to withdraw the United States from the TPP, the pact is considered all but dead. But beyond that, continued rhetoric from the Trump administration indicates a reluctance to embrace multilateral free trade deals and to move toward a more protectionist “U.S. first” trade policy.

This is a mistake, on a number of fronts. First, in an increasingly interconnected world, free and fair trade is mutually beneficial. With respect to the United States and China, our economies are already inextricably linked. The two countries are each other’s second-largest trading partner, with bilateral trade reaching $519 billion last year. And this trade is on an upward trajectory.

In the electronics industry, nearly 20% of IPC’s member companies are Chinese, and those firms and many of their foreign partners depend on predictable and open trade rules to help secure their supply chains. Why would we erect new barriers to trade with China, or skip the opportunity to lower existing barriers?

To read the full version of this column which appeared in the May 2017 issue of The PCB Magazine, click here.

Back

2017

China—A Critical Partner for Trade

06-09-2017

Count me among those business leaders who thought the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) was on the right track last year and would have brought significant benefits to all nations, including the United States. Before President Trump withdrew the United States from the TPP trade negotiations, I had argued it would have unified the world’s most dynamic economic region—bringing together developed and developing countries that collectively represent 825 million consumers and 40% of the world’s economic output.

View Story

One World, One Industry: 100 Days In—President Trump and a Better Manufacturing Policy

04-19-2017

To truly increase the number of American manufacturing jobs, President Trump should support increased investment in research and development for advanced manufacturing, promote and fund STEM education in primary and secondary schools, and build stronger apprenticeship programs. It is this type of investment—in human capital and technology—that will truly help make American manufacturing great again.

View Story

One World, One Industry: IPC’s Global Policy Framework for 2017—Smart Advocacy for the Industry

04-10-2017

As President Trump was being sworn in several weeks ago, and as the new Congress was getting down to work, IPC released its Global Policy Framework for 2017. As we work to represent more than 3,800 member facilities across the electronics industry’s global supply chain, IPC will adhere to this framework to guide our policy work in the coming months. All of our advocacy efforts are aimed at fostering an environment in which electronics manufacturers and their suppliers can thrive and grow.

View Story

One World, One Industry: Emerging Technology, Training for the Future, and the Next Industrial Revolution

02-13-2017

Technology isn’t just a tangible entity. It moves beyond what we can see, feel, and touch. It is ideas and theories. It includes philosophy and risks. In a way, technology itself is like the stock market. Different industries hedge their bets on emerging trends. These trends develop into useful products that change our world.

View Story

One World, One Industry: Implications of the Trump Presidency

01-20-2017

Our biggest concern is the impact on international trade. Specifically, President-elect Trump has said he would drop U.S. participation in the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), put a hold on the Trans-Atlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (T-TIP), seek to renegotiate NAFTA, slap higher tariffs on imports from China, and seek greater penalties on nations accused of dumping products or raw materials and committing intellectual property violations.

View Story
Back

2016

One World, One Industry: Strengthening Your Value Proposition to Boost Organization Success

12-16-2016

John Mitchell's new column's title says it all: One World, One Industry. In the coming columns, the IPC president will be covering issues affecting the entire global electronics industry supply chain with specific expertise on global standards, education, advocacy and solutions.

View Story

One World, One Industry: Six Leadership Lessons from 20 Years in the Electronics Industry

11-07-2016

The orchestra conductor is an apt metaphor for the successful leader. Effective leadership often boils down to the ability to inspire others (the symphony) to their best work, while keeping and driving the overall vision of the organization (the musical score).

View Story

One World, One Industry: Voting — A Civic Duty and Industry Opportunity

10-17-2016

On Tuesday, November 8, more than 240 million people in the United States will have the opportunity to go to the polls and vote, make their voices heard in government, and influence the direction of public policy for years to come. Much of the world is closely watching with interest in this major U.S. election.

View Story
Copyright © 2017 I-Connect007. All rights reserved.